From Losice history:

  

...On Saturday August 22,1942, the S.S. and the Ukrainian police sealed the ghetto. They were assembled in the central square of Losice, near the municipality building, and from there continued walking in the direction of the town of Mordy. On the outskirts of Losice, the German soldiers started to shoot, murdering especially women and children, about 200 in total. The deported continued to walk in rows in the direction of the train station of Siedlce. During this terrible journey the Germans killed another 800. Fifty-five hundred Jews arrived in Siedlce, from where they were transported by train to the death camp of Treblinka.

 

 

Two Rescue Stories from Łosice

Contributed by Viktor Lewin

 

Source:  Sara Bender & Shmuel Krakowski, The Encyclopedia of the Righteous Among the Nations, Poland, Yad Vashem, Jerusalem 2004, pp 326

I

 

   In August 1942, during the liquidation of the Łosice ghetto in the Warsaw district (formerly the Lublin district), Chaya Gitla Zylbersztajn escaped with her daughter, Stella. After wandering for some months, the mother was caught, and despite possessing (forged) documents, murdered. Stella continued on her own, wandering from place to place. Despite the antisemitic environment, she miraculously met people who were ready to risk their lives for her. Among those who agreed to shelter Stella for various periods were: The Romaniuk and Zbucki couples and Wladyslawa Piotrowska from the town of Łosice*; Aniela Kalicka and the Radzikowski family from the village of Wyczolki; the Ulasiuk family from the village of Kornica; and the Mroz couple from the village of Blazejki. In May 1944, two months before the Red Army liberated the area, Stella converted to Christianity. After the war, she became a nun and entered the convent in Czestochowa. In 1968, she immigrated to Haifa, Israel, and changed her name to Zahava Tzur. In 1987, Tzur visited Poland and met her saviors. At various dates, she sent their names to Yad Vashem for inclusion in its Department of the Righteous Among the Nations.

 

  

On April 2, 1981, Yad Vashem recognized Aniela Kalicka and Waclaw Radzikowski as Righteous Among the Nations.

 

On June 27, 1985, Yad Vashem recognized Irena and Ezechiel Romaniuk as Righteous Among the Nations.

 

On May i8, 1989, Yad Vashem recognized Halina and Zyg­munt Lugowski, Jozefa and Andrzej Zdanowski and their son, Stanislaw, Rozalia and Franciszek Wielgorski, and Jozefa and Jan Ulasiuk as Righteous Among the Nations.

 

On September 21, 1989, Yad Vashem recognized Janina and Stanislaw Mroz and Wladyslawa Piotrowska as Righteons Among the Nations.

 

On April 16 1991, Yad Vashem recognized Helena Kazmierczuk Gruszka and Lucyna and Marian Piechowicz as Righteous Among the Nations.

 

On June 25, 1991, Yad Vashem recognized Jozefa and Jozef Zbucki as Righteous Among the Nations.

 

On November 26, 1992, Yad Vashem recognized Anna Radzikowska as Righteous Among the Nations.

 

On March 9, 1994, Yad Vashem recognized Waclawa Jezierska (née Radzikowska) as Righteous Among the Nations.

 

 


The Losice ghetto 1941 - photograph contributed by Warren Grynberg

 

 

I I

Source:  Sara Bender & Shmuel Krakowski, The Encyclopedia of the Righteous Among the Nations, Poland, Yad Vashem, Jerusalem 2004, Volume I1, pp 598-599

 

   Sara Riwner (née Weiman) was nine years old when her mother fled with her before the liquidation of the Łosice ghetto in the Warsaw district, where she was born. As a local citizen, Weinman had many acquaintances among the local residents and she hoped that one of them would agree to hide her. To her great disappointment, however, all those she turned to slammed the door in their faces. Because there were many Germans in the town and the hunt for Jews was unremitting, Weiman in her desperation, told her young daughter to escape on her own. Running with all her might, young Sara arrived at the grocery store owned by Roman and Maria Perycz, acquaintances of theirs who lived in the center of town. Roman Perycz was stunned to see the Jewish child in his shop, and immediately took her to his apartment where his wife Maria hid her behind their bed. The next day they told Sara that her mother had been murdered and they had decided to take her under their wing and hide her. From that day on, they cared for Sara as if she were their own daughter. Roman and Maria Perycz  had three children of their own, Zbigniew, 13, Wieslaw, 10, and Zofia, 8. The Perycz children received Sara warmly and cared for her as if she were their own sister. Because the Peryczs were very busy with their work, they left it up to the children to watch over and guard Sara, which they did willingly and very naturally. Despite their young ages, they knew that they had to keep the presence of the Jewish girl in their home a secret and they made sure she never left the house. When there were Germans in the area, they would lock her up in the outhouse, and never left her alone at home. The children were told by their parents never to invite friends over, and saving Sara became a family mission. Everything they did was motivated by pure altruism, for which they never asked for nor received any remuneration. Sara stayed with the Perycz family for about two years. After the war, when no one came to claim her, they brought Sara to a Jewish children’s home. Sara eventually immigrated to Israel, from where she remained in touch with the members of the Perycz family.

 

  

On March 19, 1987,  Yad Vashem recognized  Marian and Roman Perycz as Righteous Among the Nations.

 

 


The deportation from the Losice ghetto to Treblinka death camp - photograph contributed by Warren Grynberg

 

 


The Rynek after the deportation (source: "Lochamei Hagetaot" - Ghetto Fighters' House Holocaust and Jewish Resistance Heritage Museum)

 

The Polish Righteous, at ZCHOR

 

Back to Losice Memorial Web Site

 

Last updated July 10th, 2009

 

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